BioScope

A UC Davis Graduate Student Blog

Tag: YulongLiu

Not so devious intentions

When people are doing annoying things that affect you, how often do you feel they were intentionally direct towards you? Do you feel rage when someone cuts you off on the highway because you are sure they are just a**holes trying to take advantage of you? Do you think people are trying to sabotage your experiment when moving your -80C box from one location to the other? Well, sometimes yes, but often there is an alternative explanation. Someone could just be trying to rush to the hospital or simply misplaced your freezer box when searching through the racks during a rushed experiment. We often fixate on the potential negative intentions when there are plenty other possible explanations. Considering alternatives will lead you to reduce your bad days and avoid some unnecessary grudges. Hopefully, this short YouTube video from the School of Life can help you develop the skills to not rush-to-judgment on the benign intentions of others.  

 

-Yulong

 

 

 

This post is edited by Keith Fraga

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title

Difficult Conversations

It’s often difficult to talk about sensitive topics that involve strongly held personal beliefs.  This is especially true when that person is close to you and you don’t want to damage your relationship. Sometimes those conversations can be avoided, but do you have a plan on how to strike those conversations if they are too important to be avoided? As a scientist, I often feel obligated to promote science, particularly to the most skeptical crowds. For example, contending with the views anti-vaxers. This podcast from The New York Time’s Change Agent has some helpful insights on how to have those conversations. Specifically, the strategies (validation, getting curious, and personal stories) developed from an ex-cult member turned mental health counselor Steven Alan Hassan.

 

-Yulong

 

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-new-york-times/change-agent-2/e/53526869

 

 

This post is edited by Keith Fraga

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

March for Science on April 14th!

This year’s March for Science is on April 14th. Here is a snippet from their website. “March for Science Sacramento is part of a global movement advocating for evidence-based policy. Last year, more than 10,000 people marched in Sacramento. Please join us on April 14th and show your support for open, inclusive, and accessible science as an essential part of our democracy. Be a catalyst for change! ” Maybe I will see you there?

-Yulong

 

For more information, Please visit http://www.marchforsciencesacramento.com/  .

 

This post is edited by Linda Ma.

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

Know Your Needs- Maslow Hierarchy of Needs

What are the needs that you must satisfy to live a happy and fulfilling life? One of the most influential modern psychologists, Abraham Maslow tried to answer that question by creating the Maslow hierarchy of needs. It’s an important question to think about, not just because it might help you to achieve a happy and fulfilling life, but also how your actions might influence the people around you and their abilities to accomplish that. For example, we are talking about mentorship this month in our blog post, and being a good mentor could greatly influence some of the higher needs, such as belonging, esteem, and even self-actualization. If you can help the undergrad that you are mentoring find meaning in their work, which satisfies one of their higher needs, they are likely to be more productive. This podcast from Ted Radio Hour has an excellent introduction to the Maslow hierarchy of needs.

 

-Yulong

 

https://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/399796647/maslows-human-needs

 

This post is edited by Linda Ma.

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title. 

Image attribution: “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs” by BetterWorks Breakroom is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

Establish commonalities to increase your mentee’s productivity

Are you currently mentoring someone? Are you actively trying to connect with your mentee? Did you know that simply establishing some commonalities with your mentee can significantly increase their productiveness and their ability to learn, especially if they have a different background from you? Here is a super short podcast ( first 10 mins) talking about the actual study. Establishing commonality is often the first thing I try to do when I’m training a new undergrad, and I think that you should too.

For more about mentorship, please check out our blog post from this month.

-Yulong

 

https://www.npr.org/2015/10/13/444446708/in-the-classroom-common-ground-can-transform-gpas

 

This post is edited by Linda Ma.

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

Achieve Your Goals with WOOP

When we are facing challenges and problems, it often requires us to tackle it from multiple perspectives. For example, we are talking about impostor syndrome in this month’s blog post. On the one hand, we need to be more compassionate towards ourselves and to understand the origins of those problematic feelings in order to correct them. On the other hand, we should equip ourselves with tools that can help us directly achieve our desired outcomes. This podcast from the Hidden Brain series is about WOOP (Wish Outcome Obstacle Plan), a scientifically supported method to help you achieve your goals.

-Yulong

https://www.npr.org/2016/05/10/477379965/woop-there-it-is-four-steps-to-achieve-your-goals

 

 

Edited by Linda Ma.

Self Compassion

How compassionate are you to others, and to yourself? I often feel that it’s so much easier to be sympathetic, forgiving, and supportive to others than to myself. Since we are talking about impostor syndrome this month in our blog post, which self-compassion plays an important role in, I wanted to share with you this short video that contains a 6-step exercise to help you become a more well balanced and self-compassionate scientist.

-Yulong

 

 

Edited by Linda Ma.

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