BioScope

A UC Davis Graduate Student Blog

Category: scientist_2.0

Making scientific figures with Adobe Illustrator

Illustrations are often an integral part of a scientific manuscript, especially when conveying complex ideas and data. Additionally, a beautiful illustration is just so nice to look at. Lucky for us, we don’t have to spend years to master drawing those illustrations anymore like in the good ol’ days because there are many software options available to help us make these illustrations. Adobe Illustrator is one of the most powerful tools out there for creating illustrations and is more versatile than the more commonly used Powerpoint. However, it is something that you might not be familiar with and with a slightly steeper learning curve. I came across a retweet from our very own Sydney Wyatt about this Adobe Illustrator guide wrote by Connie Jiang, an MD/PhD Student at UPenn, and I was amazed by how useful it was for a beginner user like me. The guide is orientated for scientists. It covers basic usage and also a range of specific topics such as design scale bar, making poster templates, and color-blind friendly colors. I hope you will find this guide useful, and make the transition from Powerpoint. 

Yulong 

 

Blog post

http://rajlaboratory.blogspot.com/2019/08/i-adobe-illustrator-for-scientific.html

Guide 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1TXmbltzBPcApCcuJ9HLOIQgWPqKylrFRWRudrN-5vBE/edit#

 

Edited by Sydney Wyatt 

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

Informational interviews, a must-do for your next career move.

I truly believe informational interviews are one of the most important things you need to do when you are planning your next career move. An informational interview is a process by which you can access all the insider information about your next job that you most likely not going to find online. Sadly, I found the majority of the graduate students that I have talked to do not really know what it is or the purpose that these interviews serve. For those who have never heard of informational interviews before, it is a non-formal conversation to seek information about specific careers and companies. Although it’s not something from which you can be hired directly, the valuable information that you can get from this can give you a significant competitive edge and some even have received an actual interview directly from their interaction with the interviewer. In my personal experience, I did a couple of informational interviews for industry postdoc positions, and I found there are major differences in the optimal ways to apply for those same positions between companies. Here is a great video from Cheeky Scientist with useful tips and mistakes to avoid when you are conducting an informational interview, and the video is specifically tailored to graduate students. 

-Yulong 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZifvsYPpqH8

 

Edited by Jennifer Baily

This video was originally brought to my attention by the FUTURE program’s course. The FUTURE program is a career exploration/preparation course that I highly recommend to everyone. Here is their website if you are interested https://future.ucdavis.edu/  .   

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

Tweet your way to success in science communication

Do you have a Twitter? Do you use Twitter to communicate and promote your science? In the past couple of years, Twitter has developed into the preferred social media platform for scientists to communicate their science to a broader audience. You may have heard of this already and even noticed that your favorite conference now has an official hashtag. However, it can be daunting for many people to make the leap into the Twitter-verse. That includes me. This blog article was co-authored by a UCD graduate student and contributor for Forbes, Priya Shukla(@priyology), is a great beginner guide for scientists who want to start their own Twitter. It also contains many useful tips and suggestions tailored for scientists to get you up running in no time. As the article suggests, communicating your science to a broader audience can help you become more well known in your field and even may help you to find your next job. 

https://www.thexylom.com/scientists-meet-twitter

-Yulong Liu 

 

Edited by Keith Fraga

This article was originally introduced to me from the FUTURE program’s course. The FUTURE program is a career exploration/preparation course that I highly recommend everyone to take. Here is their website if you are interested https://future.ucdavis.edu/  .   

 

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

Keep calm and read on – Top tips for staying on top of your reading

Do you know there are about 2.5 million papers published each year? It certainly can be difficult and daunting to keep track of the relevant papers that are related to your research. You may already know about using Google Scholar or PubCrawler to keep you updated, but are you using them efficiently? I have seen many people’s weekly update with hundreds of papers because they are using very general terms. It’s understandable that you don’t want to miss anything, but you are going to spend so much time combing through them. Here are the “Ten tips to stay on top of your reading during grad school” from the publisher PLOS, including tips on how to optimize your search terms by using Boolean operators like AND and OR.

https://blogs.plos.org/thestudentblog/2017/01/12/ten-tips-to-stay-on-top-of-your-reading-during-grad-school/

 

-Yulong Liu

 

Edited by Emily Cartwright

Suggested by Keith Fraga

For any content suggestions or general recommendations, please email to UCDBioScope@gmail.com and put science 2.0 in the title.

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